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5 Clever Ways to Get Your Past Due Accounts to Pay You Now

Posted on Jun 8, 2020

5 Clever Ways to Get Your Past Due Accounts to Pay You Now

A legal battle is always the last resort. If you have debtors that refuse to pay what they owe to you, there are some things you can do to make them take action without legal action. It takes some cleverness and creativity but is much easier than you imagined it to be to implement. To help you with the process, we’ve come up with some surefire solutions for getting paid. Below, learn five clever ways to get your past due accounts to pay you now. #1: Be friendly but firm. Make all communications going forward feel like friendly reminders but spell out the terms and conditions of the repayment plan options available for the debtor to choose from today. Letting them know what the consequences are for not paying a debt can help them see the urgency in doing so right away. #2: Point out the clause that deals with all monies owed. Remind them of the legal contract that exists between you and them. Clearly label the invoice with the appropriate language that causes them to take action and accountability for the debt they owe. #3: Get them to agree to have payments automatically drafted from their bank account. Rather than allow them to submit payment by phone, ask that they have the money taken out of their bank account automatically each month. Help them see the value in automatic payments by stating how easy it is to forget to pay manually. #4: Offer them a deal where they pay less than what they owe. You can allow the debtor to settle the debt in full for less. If they pay off the balance today, offer them a five to ten percent discount. #5: Give them multiple payment options. Let them decide which payment method works best for them. That way, you’re not met with resistance because they don’t have a major credit card or have lost their debit card. Ace Process Service Helps You Get the Money That is Owed to You Are you still having trouble collecting on past due accounts? Let Ace Process Service assist you with the matter so that you’re not wasting valuable time getting results. We’ll file the necessary paperwork with the court on your behalf so that you can spend your time focused on something else. If you have multiple debtors that refuse to pay, let us know so we can make one trip to serve them with a notice to appear in...

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Maintain Your Distance By Having Ace Process Service File Your Court Documents

Posted on Apr 13, 2020

Maintain Your Distance By Having Ace Process Service File Your Court Documents

Stay at home where you belong during the coronavirus outbreak. Timing is everything. If you can amicably settle a debt between you and a debtor, it’s essential to do so. It prevents you from going to court where you risk exposure to the coronavirus. If financial concerns make collecting the debt imperative to your survival, let us take care of you with our rush court service. We’ll take the precautionary measures necessary to protect ourselves while we file your relevant documents with the court. What Rush Court Service Entails The expedited service allows us to file time-sensitive documents on your behalf, so you don’t need to enter the courthouse. We also serve necessary paperwork to the debtor, so they’re aware of what is taking place about their outstanding debt. We prefer to limit our contact with people as much as possible, so we request that you use the service only when it is imperative to do so. Keep in mind that you will receive a court date that you must attend if the court has not closed. It is a possibility, so being diligent about following updates is imperative. You’ll need to contact the court for further instruction if your small claims hearing gets moved to another date. That way, you don’t miss your opportunity to see the judge and discuss your case. What to Do When You Need to File a Lawsuit in Small Claims Court There is no need to expose yourself to a potential health risk for the time being. If you can postpone action until a later date, please consider doing so. If writing a final request for payment doesn’t warrant the response you hoped for, feel free to contact us. We’ll be able to answer any questions that you have about our services as well as what to expect in the upcoming weeks if the courts close...

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Is Small Claims Mediation Right for Me?

Posted on Feb 10, 2020

If you are considering filing a case against someone, you might be curious if small claims mediation is right for you. Small claims mediation is most useful when the dispute is with someone you know or you want to keep a positive ongoing relationship with. Small claims mediation is low cost and sometimes free, which makes it an ideal option for those who wish to resolve disputes amicably.  Taking part in an angry or bitter case before a judge is often damaging to relationships. Individuals who want to maintain a positive relationship get the most out of small claims mediation because they can have a discussion about the issues while sharing their frustrations in a way that may not be allowed in a court setting. Mediation can be beneficial even for those who are not concerned about necessarily maintaining a close relationship. A successful mediation also reduces the chance that a case will be lost. Additionally, you can keep control of the whole process in mediation; whereas in court, the judge has control. Mediation also offers an immediate resolution and the other party is typically more likely to hold up their end of the deal or payment requirement. When someone loses in court, they often drag their feet when it comes to paying or they fail to out of anger.  Small claims court mediation may not be for everyone. If you just want what you are asking for (no more or no less, no matter the reason), or if you just want the opposing party to suffer in a court case before a judge, then mediation is likely not worth your time. Consider what outcome you want to see from a case before you make the decision to...

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Failure to Pay a Judgement in Small Claims Court

Posted on Jan 13, 2020

If you have lost a small claims case, you are required to pay any amount you owe to the winning side. Sometimes people can’t afford to pay or just don’t want to, hoping that the consequences will disappear quickly, but this does not happen. The judgement creditor is often given (by the state) a set amount of time to collect the debt owed to them – for example, California allows ten years.  If you fail to pay, interest will accumulate at a rate of 3% to as high as 12% annually. Depending on the state you live in will determine how much you owe and the longer you wait to pay, the more money you will owe.  Collection Tools Used Against You If you fail to pay, there are several avenues the judgement creditor can travel to force you to pay your debt. These tools include the following: Bank levy. A bank will be instructed to withdraw funds in your account to go toward the balance you owe until the judgement is paid off. Wage garnishment. Your employer can be required (and forced by law) to deduct money from your check every month until your judgement balance is paid in full.Till tap. Law enforcement may be instructed to enter into your business and empty your cash register to pay toward your debt.Seizure. The judgement creditor can take personal possessions, real estate or other forms of property to sell at an auction to earn money to go toward your judgement. This is less likely for a creditor to do because it takes a lot of time and expense but if you own valuable property that is paid in full, it is a possibility.Keeper. Similar to a till tap, an officer is instructed to take customer funds for a longer duration of time, such as an entire day’s worth of cash earnings. The only way to avoid the above methods being taken against you is to communicate with the judgement collector and work to pay your debt...

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Dischargeable vs Non-Dischargeable Debt in Bankruptcy

Posted on Dec 9, 2019

If you owe money to a creditor, the creditor might be able to take you to small claims court. If the creditor wins and you owe them money, the court can issue a judgement, allowing the creditor rights to attempt to collect the funds you owe them, such by filing the judgement as a lien against property you own until you either refinance or sell. What about if a person files bankruptcy? Here we will discuss more about judgement liens where bankruptcy is concerned. Many debts are forgiven, or dischargeable, when it comes to bankruptcy cases, while others are not. Non-dischargeable debt is still owed after bankruptcy ends. If your judgement pertains to a non-dischargeable debt, you will not have financial relief from the debt when you file for bankruptcy. Any liens will remain after bankruptcy, meaning you will still owe it until it is paid or it otherwise becomes uncollectible as according to state law. Non-dischargeable debt can include: Student loans (in most circumstances)Recent income taxesChild support or other domestic support obligationsDebt coming from bodily injury or death as a result of your intoxication Other debts may be ordinarily discharged but a creditor can ask that certain debts be mad enon-dischargeable by the court. Examples of these include: You committed a crime to gain money, services or goods (such as lying on an application for credit).You embezzled money.You caused injury to someone else willfully. If a judgement lien is issued against you that is associated with dischargeable debt and you file bankruptcy, your debt will be cleared. This means the creditor cannot take action against you to obtain the...

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Dischargeable vs Non-Dischargeable Debt in Bankruptcy

Posted on Oct 14, 2019

Dischargeable vs Non-Dischargeable Debt in Bankruptcy

If you owe money to a creditor, the creditor might be able to take you to small claims court. If the creditor wins and you owe them money, the court can issue a judgment, allowing the creditor rights to attempt to collect the funds you owe them, such by filing the judgement as a lien against property you own until you either refinance or sell. What about if a person files bankruptcy? Here we will discuss more about judgment liens where bankruptcy is concerned.  Many debts are forgiven, or dischargeable, when it comes to bankruptcy cases, while others are not. Non-dischargeable debt is still owed after bankruptcy ends. If your judgment pertains to a non-dischargeable debt, you will not have financial relief from the debt when you file for bankruptcy. Any liens will remain after bankruptcy, meaning you will still owe it until it is paid or it otherwise becomes uncollectible as according to state law.  Non-dischargeable debt can include: Student loans (in most circumstances)Recent income taxesChild support or other domestic support obligationsDebt coming from bodily injury or death as a result of your intoxication Other debts may be ordinarily discharged but a creditor can ask that certain debts be made non-dischargeable by the court. Examples of these include: You committed a crime to gain money, services or goods (such as lying on an application for credit).You embezzled money.You caused injury to someone else willfully. If a judgment lien is issued against you that is associated with dischargeable debt and you file bankruptcy, your debt will be cleared. This means the creditor cannot take action against you to obtain the...

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